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Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Is Coming, Samsung Execs Confirm

By Monica U Santos , Jan 24, 2017 03:03 AM EST
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After the big recall of the Galaxy Note 7, Samsung decided to still continue its series with the soon to be released new flagship phablet to be called as the Samsung Galaxy Note 8.

Samsung Galaxy Note 8 Is Coming

According to The Next Web, following several months of investigating, Samsung finally revealed what purportedly caused Galaxy Note 7 devices to burst on into flames. The tech giant blamed the malfunction on two separate battery-related issues. The first is the design flaw in the upper right corner of the units and a welding defect from a supplier, both of which caused the smartphone's batteries to create a short circuit and blow up.

Samsung's mobile chief DJ Koh confirmed that the South Korean manufacturer has plans to unveil a new and improved Samsung Galaxy Note 8 later this year. As reported by CNET, with the new flagship smartphone, Samsung promises to "bring back a better, safer and very innovative" successor to the fire-catching Galaxy Note 7.

“We found through the investigative process, we knew there are lots and lots of loyal Note customers,” Koh said in an interview.

Tim Baxter, president of the Samsung US said that a large number of users of Galaxy Note 4, as well as Galaxy Note 5, are still loyal since they are all hoping and waiting for an upgrade for their smartphone devices. With that, the company will proceed to deliver the most-awaited upgrade.

Why Samsung Is Sticking With The Galaxy Note 8?

"I will bring back a better, safer and very innovative Note 8," Koh said.

According to critics, the decision is a very risky move for Samsung, given the baggage the Galaxy Note brand now carries. For the past few months, airline attendants were required to say that Samsung Galaxy Note 7 smartphones could not be carried on flights, even if they were powered off. The Samsung Galaxy Note 8, which following previous years' precedent will likely debut fall of this year and will serve as a measuring stick for how much progress the South Korean tech company makes in the coming months.

"A lot is going to be based on the next great thing that comes out that's problem-free," said Thomas Cooke, a professor at Georgetown's McDonough School of Business.

 

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