Science

3D Map Of The Universe Contains 1.2 Million Galaxies & Proves Einstein’s Dark Energy Theory

By Ian , Jul 21, 2016 04:50 AM EDT
A 3D map of the universe has been released containing up to 1.2 million galaxies in the latest iteration. (Photo : Pro Documentary/Youtube)

The universe is probably one of the most enigmatic fields of science to tackle. However, the introduction of technological breakthrough like 3D mapping can provide us a glimpse on how the cosmos actually looks without driving out into space. The recent publication of the universe's 3D map includes up to 1.2 million galaxies, which supports Einstein's Theory on Dark Energy.

Dark Energy or dark matter in some books is the mysterious yet assumed energy that makes the universe expand outward. This is in contrast to the notion that the entities in the universe should have been pulling each other due to gravity. However, the confirmation that the universe expands tells something about an energy that makes planets and stars go farther away from each other.

The Sloan Digital Sky Survey III project is the main program that mapped and analyzed a quarter of the sky. It charted 650 cubic billion light years to study dark energy. The program is composed of international consortium of astronomers with the same goal of mapping.

Tech Times has confirmed that the study involved more than ten years of mapping 1.2 million galaxies. The 3D map that has been rendered is capable of recreating the measurement of the universe with great accuracy in terms of dark energy influence. With the project, the law of gravity and general relativity has once again found a confirmatory notion.

A technique called BOSS or baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey was used by the astronomers to measure the rate of expansion in the universe according to an article from News Australia. As the data comes in, the confirmation of the dark energy is consistent with the cosmological constant has been established.

The cosmological constant is the value of the space's vacuum energy density as previously proposed by Einstein in 1917. Astronomers now agree that the constant is consistent throughout time and will continue to do so as long as the universe exists.

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