Science

New Study Explains How Body Produces Cholesterols

By Charles Omedo , Feb 08, 2017 11:18 PM EST
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A recent report titled "Managing Your Cholesterol" and published by the Harvard Special Health Report reveals how the human body produces the famed cholesterols and the kinds of cholesterols that impact the human body and health. The findings covered in the report show that people basically give cholesterol a bad name, alleging that it causes heart diseases and even blame almost all the food people eat for this phenomenon. While this is not entirely untrue, the fact remains that there are several types of cholesterols and the body produces most of them with only a minimal amount coming from the foods we eat.

Research says about 20% of your body cholesterol comes from the food you eat

While nutritionists and company ads blame the foods we eat for our cholesterol problems, the new research from Harvard scientists reveal that your body can't wait around for food to access the cholesterols it needs for physiological functions - so your liver and intestines manufacture about 80% of the cholesterols your body needs for proper functioning and good health, while only 20% of your cholesterol comes from the foods you eat, Harvard Medical School wrote.

Consuming one egg per day will provide you with between 200-300 milligrams of cholesterol on daily basis - since an egg yolk has about 200 milligrams of cholesterol; while your intestines and liver will naturally produce the remaining 800 milligrams of cholesterol per day, sourcing these from proteins, sugar and fat among other organic nutrients.

Health experts say cholesterol is not entirely bad, and that it is so essential to health and body functions that every cell in the body produces it and makes it available in the bloodstream. It appears waxy and like a whitish-yellow fat under scrutiny. Cell membranes are composed entirely of cholesterol, and it is the main ingredient used in manufacturing vitamin D, sex hormones, and secreted by the liver as bile acids to melt fat in the body.

February is American Heart Month, so watch your cardiovascular health

Considering the fact that this month is designated as American Heart Month, health experts warn everyone to watch out for their heart health through what they eat and physical exercises, the Washington Times wrote. Heart disease impacts on the structure or shape of the heart, its electrical rhythm, and blood vessels; and this can play out as chest pain, high blood pressure, irregular heartbeats, heart failure and other cardiovascular events. The best way to take care of your heart is by avoiding excess cholesterol which could clog the arteries with plaque, and to exercise regularly while also watching what we eat on daily basis.

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