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HIV Cure Update: Who's More Successful - Gilead And GlaxoSmithKline?

By Cyril , Feb 11, 2017 01:29 AM EST
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Two of the pharmaceutical giants, Gilead Sciences and GlaxoSmithKline, are both set for a face off against each other after they have officially announced the launching of their versions of cure for HIV. It was recently revealed that the two biotechnology companies will be presenting their clinical results of their competing HIV drugs at an HIV conference in Seattle, Washington next week. The said presentations are bound to take place next week as revealed by authorities from both parties.

Gilead's Quest For HIV

According to reports revealed by Investopedia, Gilead's bictegravir, which was formerly named as GS-9883, is said to be the much-touted new-age integrates inhibitor. Gilead authorities have also added that their bictegravir has allegedly been approved by the U.S. Food And Drug Administration (FDA) in August 2013 to treating HIV infection. Experts from the said company claim that bictegravir has the ability to offer advantages of better drug effectiveness along with limited side effects.

GlaxoSmithKline's Version Of HIV Cure

Meanwhile, as per Specialty Pharmacy Times, GlaxoSmithKline or GSK's dolutegravir is bound to highlight the advantages of its new 2-drug combination treatment regimen for HIV, as compared with the conventional 3-drug cocktails. In one of his statements, chief executive of GSK, Andrew Witty has claimed that dolutegravir's Holy Grail was the fact that it has been proven to have a track record in preventing the virus from becoming drug resistant. Witty adds that dolutegravir has an extremely impressive resistance profile.

On the other hand, it was found that GlaxoSmithKline has already reported success in clinical trials conducted last December. While it was said that the results from Gilead's phase 2 trial comparing bictegravir with dolutegravir used as part of a drug-drug combination is allegedly set to be presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections on February 13, 2017. Ultimately, a significant number of experts believe that the public will be the ones who will benefit the most since the end-target is to determine which of these promising drugs do have the ability to treat patients with HIV.

           

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