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China’s Take On HIV: China To Promote Traditional Chinese Medicine Against HIV

By Cyril , Feb 17, 2017 02:39 AM EST
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BEIJING - NOVEMBER 23: A Chinese medicine seller (R) weighs traditional Chinese herbs at a medicine shop on November 23, 2006 in Beijing, China. The berbs as one part of Chinese medicines is very popular but some medical experts in China are publicly disparaging of the tradition proclaiming 'the Chinese no longer need the medicine and it is a time to bidit farewell'. (Photo : Guang Niu/Getty Images)

In their continuous efforts to eradicate the problem in HIV, Chinese officials have recently revealed that the country will now be using traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). In line with this, the country will also be expected to double the number of HIV/AIDS patients it can give treatments to as part of a broader push to increase the use of the ancient practice in the country's medical system. Furthermore, the promotion of TCM is said to be a part of China's five-year plan from the State Council, China's Cabinet, to tackle HIV/Aids (acquired immune deficiency syndrome).

China's Take On HIV

In one of their statements revealed by Star2, the State Council has already claimed on their website that the number of people living with AIDS who are treated with traditional Chinese medicine should be twice what it was in 2015. It was found that the plan that has been outlined in collaboration between traditional Chinese medicine departments and national health and family planning commissions is to allegedly find a therapeutic regimen which combines traditional Chinese medicine and Western medicines. Long before, TCM has been widely used in China in treating various ailments using herbal mixtures and physical therapies such as acupuncture and cupping.

Traditional Chinese Medicine Against HIV

On the other hand, according to reports revealed by Straits Times Online, it was found that the science behind such remedies has long been questioned. Just last month, medical researchers have allegedly disputed a study which claims that acupuncture could cure babies of colic. However, in late December, the Chinese legislature had passed its first TCM law, which will reportedly allow certain practitioners to be licensed and make it easier for them to open clinics.

Meanwhile, earlier this year, Chinese authorities have added certain traditional Chinese Medicines to the country's National Reimbursement Drug List (NRDL). They continue to explain that the medicines that are listed will be partly sponsored by the state and the recent change is seen as a push for TCM. As of the press time, it was found that there are over 2,000 drugs listed, most of which are traditional medicines, however, modern medicines are also included.

           

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