Culture

‘13 Reasons Why’ Saving Australians From Committing Suicide?

By Sounak Mukhopadhyay , Apr 20, 2017 05:10 AM EDT
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Netflix’s “13 Reasons Why” has been under fire for “mishandling” serious issues like depression and suicide. (Photo : Generic Username/YouTube)

Netflix's "13 Reasons Why" has been under fire for "mishandling" serious issues like depression and suicide. While the teenage drama has been hailed for its authentic depiction of such problems, a number of experts feel that the TV show might actually harm those who already have suicidal thoughts. Now, here is one news update that will surely make fans happier about the show. According to reports, a number of people in Australia are now seeking professional help after watching the show.

According to Australian mental health groups, calls to suicide helplines in the country have significantly increased after "13 Reasons Why" was launched on March 31. Now, there are two ways of interpreting it. According to Kristen Douglas from Headspace, more people are now considering suicide as a possible option for them. The national manager of the youth mental health foundation said the show had exposed viewers to "risky suicide content." "It's far more likely for young people to connect with this content and think it's the answer for them," The Hollywood Reporter quoted her as saying.

Here is the other way of interpreting the fact that more people in Australia are now calling suicide helplines after watching the Netflix show. It also means that people are not silently taking the decision to end their life, like Hannah Baker in the show. They are now open to talking to professionals about their issues. Trained professional attend calls on suicide helplines, and they try their best to stop a person from committing suicide. Anybody who is having suicidal thoughts is encouraged to call these helpline numbers so that professionals can help them.

"13 Reasons Why" is facing harsh criticism anyway because of the way it has depicted depression and suicide. Headspace has issued strong warnings against the "dangerous contents" in the show. According to Dr. Steven Leicester, parents and clinicians have been more concerned since the release of the show. "There is a responsibility for broadcasters to know what they are showing and the impact that certain content can have on an audience - and on a young audience in particular," he said.

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