Games

Top Creepypasta Inspired By Video Games To Read During Halloween

By Joyce Karlan S. Pike , Oct 12, 2016 08:57 PM EDT

Halloween is coming and I couldn't think of a better way for Video Game lovers and avid readers to enjoy it rather than reading Creepypasta. These short stories spawned countless famous horror icons such as Slenderman-and thus the inspiration for the game. This list however are Creepypastas inspired by video games and not the other way around. So sit back, relax, and have your friends on speed dial.

Ben Drowned. This is a well known Creepypasta created by Alex Hall, whose username is "Jadusable", and it revolves around a Majora's Mask cartridge they bought from an unreliable source. This cartridge is allegedly haunted by the ghost of a boy named Ben.

Although some may not find the story creepy, users have utilized the internet by making and featuring videos of a glitched-out ROM of Majora's Mask. Some may not find the haunted cartridge story believable but the way the narrator delivered the story is sure stimulate your imagination. Jadusable made use of little but effective details that will surely creep you out.

Lavender Town Syndrome. As a kid, I do remember playing the original Pokemon games and the moment I entered Lavender town; I couldn't quite pinpoint as to why it felt different. Maybe because of the eerie music and dark atmosphere every 8-bit pixels are emitting from my Game Boy Screen - or the reason could be is the people seemed so scared. Either way, I did quite like my stay in Lavender Town as a game meant for kids can only do so much.

Then again, I heard about the popular Creepypasta that circulated online claiming that an original version of the Lavender Town theme has been tied to a wave of child suicides. What made the story gruseomely creepy is that people who claimed to have experienced some sort of creepiness from Lavender Town have popped up massively. These unexplainable behaviors have been dubbed Lavender Town Syndrome.

Polybius. A mysterious arcade game called Polybius showed up out of nowhere in Portland, Oregon back in the early eighties. This game allegedly caused some players to have hallucinations, nightmares, and make them commit suicide.

Witnesses also claim to have seen men dressed in black suits identifying themselves as government workers collecting data from the game. The game disappeared abruptly in a similar manner as the way it came-no one knew how or why. This led people to weave theories that the arcade game was a government experiment meant to test subliminal messages in video games and its effects.

Pale Luna. This is probably one of my favorites. The story tells of a text-based adventure game called Pale Luna, which some players have given up on as it was initially passed off as broken or unplayable. It only accepts specific commands and if players input an "unacceptable" one, the game would crash and cause the entire computer to freeze; and thus, would require a hard reboot of the game.

Pale Luna is short but amazingly effective. This might be due to the fact that the writer had an effective way of telling the story - as if the readers were thoroughly immersed in Pale Luna's story.

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