Science

Resurrecting Dead People Using Stem Cells Given The Green Light

By Donna Bellevue , Mar 10, 2017 02:04 AM EST
TUCSON, AZ - DECEMBER 09: Human remains in body bags lie in the refrigerated morgue of the Pima County Office of the Medical Examiner on December 9, 2014 in Tucson, Arizona. Forensic anthropologists attempt to identify the deceased by studying personal effects and bodily remains. Most are from undocumented immigrants, many of whom died of dehydration while crossing illegally into the U.S. from Mexico. The center currently has 90 bodies in the morgue and, on average, receives 176 per year, most found by ranchers and Border Patrol agents. Identified remains are repatriated, along with personal items, to their home countries, and the others will be cremated. (Photo : John Moore/Getty Images)

Scientists are getting ethical permission from health watchdogs to resurrect dead people by using a combination of regeneration therapies. Starting this year, the groundbreaking Project Reanima will primarily use stem cells to stimulate the regrowth of neurons in clinically dead patients. Bioquark Inc., an American biotech company, is one of medical companies given the green light to conduct the trials on 20 brain dead patients from traumatic injuries.

Leading the team is Dr Himanshu Bansal, Indian specialist who works with Biotech companies Revita Life Sciences and Bioquark Inc,. The team will use a combination of therapies, which include injecting the brain with stem cells and a cocktail of peptides, as well as deploying lasers and nerve stimulation techniques. The procedure has been shown to bring patients out of comas.

The resurrection technique using stem cells will test whether parts of the dead patients' central nervous system can be brought back to life. Scientists believe that the brain stem cells may be able to erase their history and re-start life again based on their surrounding tissue. The process is similar to that in creatures like salamanders who can regrow entire limbs.

“This represents the first trial of its kind and another step towards the eventual reversal of death in our lifetime," Dr Ira Pastor, CEO of Bioquark Inc., says. He hopes that the team can start recruiting patients immediately from the hospital they are currently working with to identify families where there may be a religious or medical barrier to organ donation. He adds that the complex initiative can start to yield results within the first two to three months, The Mind Unleashed reports.

While a lack of evidence suggests that resurrecting dead people is impossible, the Bioquark team has highly recognized neurological researchers leading the project. Aside from Dr. Bansal, the team also has Dr. Calixto Machado, who has written extensively on brain death and is a member of American Academy of Neurology, the Christian Truther reports. The trial will begin at Anupam Hospital in India, where the medically certified brain dead recruits are only kept from decomposing by life support machines.

© 2017 ITECHPOST, All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission.
Real Time Analytics