NASA Hubble Images: Space Telescope Celebrates Moon Night With Stunning Galactical Photos

NASA Hubble Images: Space Telescope Celebrates Moon Night With Stunning Galactical Photos
NASA marked International Observe the Moon Night on Saturday, and what better way to celebrate the event than having the Hubble Space Telescope share the Earth's natural satellite and other moons in the Solar System? Photo : NORBERTO DUARTE/AFP via Getty Images

NASA marked International Observe the Moon Night on Saturday, and what better way to celebrate the event than having the Hubble Space Telescope share the Earth's natural satellite and other moons in the Solar System?

NASA Hubble Images Show Breathtaking Lunar Photos

In a tweet, the NASA Hubble Twitter account posted images of the Moon and others located in the Solar System, including those alongside Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. These photos certainly provide that astonishing view of such celestial bodies.

On Saturday, avid moon observers and astronomy buffs looked up to the moon to mark the annual event. NASA suggested that observers doesn't need to use tools, telescopes or binoculars to see that Earth's treasure of the night sky that is easy to spot, Space.com revealed. On International Observe the Moon Night, the Moon was at waxing gibbous, an intermediate phase in which it is not yet full, offering great chances for Moon viewing along the "terminator" or the line between night and day.

The upcoming Full Moon phase is set on October 20.

According to NASA, International Observe the Moon Night is a yearly event that offers opportunities for the public to "learn about lunar science and exploration, observe celestial bodies, and honor personal and cultural connections to the Moon."

A "Global Moon Party" kicked off the event on October 9 with various social media activities. Public participation will continue until October 23.

Read Also: NASA Captures Chilling Moon Shadow During Eclipse: What Is EPIC Camera and How Did It Take the Photo?

NASA Holds Bevy of Activities for International Moon Night

NASA also aired a pair of live webcasts, with hosts guiding viewers to a scientific and cultural expedition to the Moon, Space.com added in a separate post. During the webcasts, viewers enjoyed close-up views of the lunar surface as seen through telescopes in Chile and the Canary Islands.

This was made possible through NASA's partnership with Slooh, an online remote telescope service that lets users control its robotic telescopes located in certain areas around the world.

NASA stressed that the Moon is that "stepping stone" in exploring more about our Solar System, galaxy and universe.

It coincides with the launch the U.S. space agency's Lucy mission to explore Trojan asteroids and allow people to better understand the origins of the Solar System. The Lucy probe will head out to Jupiter to take a close look at two groups of asteroids around the gas giant, which NASA said are remains from the formation of the planets, BBC reported. As such, these would provide important clues about the Solar System's evolution.

NASA has pushed lunar exploration in the past decades, emphatically with Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Edwin "Buzz" Aldrin being the first men on the Moon on July 16, 1969, doing experiments and momentously leaving a U.S. flag on the lunar surface.

NASA would soon continue this legacy with its planned Artemis mission, sending the first woman and first person of color to the Moon in the coming years.

Related Article: Internet on the Moon? How NASA Artemis Mission Will Make Lunar Connectivity Possible

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